INDia

Angel BARRERA, Sourcing Director

India is for me the before and after of the new reality we live in: the pandemic almost took me by surprise when I arrived from India, and I narrowly escaped being confined there.

 

Pre-pandemia and post-pandemia. Before and after. This is what India stands for me. I started in a rather comical way, thinking that the Senior partner of one of our producers was his father. I started a new business relationship and discovered a new origin getting into trouble. Nothing new under the sun.

 

In India, I discovered a lot of things I didn't know, and at the same time, I hope I made our (now) partners learn a few more.

Coffee production in India is all about sharing risk - a very English tradition that is still on today. Coffee plantations grow under the protective shade of huge oak trees, oaks that are also embraced by pepper vines that grow tall and wide.

In India, I discovered a lot of things I didn't know, and at the same time, I hope I made our (now) partners learn a few more.

Coffee production in India is all about sharing risk - a very English tradition that is still on today. Coffee plantations grow under the protective shade of huge oak trees, oaks that are also embraced by pepper vines that grow tall and wide.

 

A triple production making up a forest. Palm trees also grow on the edges of the farms, and I am told that they produce a kind of palm heart that people chew like tobacco. Agroforestry. We can also add that there are two sides to coffee production: up to a certain altitude, robusta coffee trees grow, and from there up to the top of the mountains, arabica coffee trees grow. “If the price of coffee is low, the price of pepper might be higher”, says Sunil, a Belco partner producer, “and even if the price is quite low, sometimes robusta helps us make up for the losses”, he concludes. The coffee is mainly exported, the pepper is sold both for export and on the local market, and the palm heart, which is chewed, is sold exclusively nationally. Do you see why I say it is a perfect distribution of risk for the producer? Not to mention the biodiversity that such productions can generate.

On your tables, you will taste some washed coffee, with a characteristic Indian profile, but these are farms we hope in the future will be able to work on different projects. Despite being forests, the temperature rises, and we will probably have to organize new drying methods to improve the conservation of the beans over time.

 But at the same time - I think you already know us at Belco - there is something about developing naturals and giving all the benefit of the doubt to quality robustas that is stronger than us.

BELCO

PRIMEURS

CAFÉS

2022